Vitamin D Levels are Associated with Liver Disease Severity in Patients with Cirrhosis

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Megan A. Rech
Natasha Von Roenn
Ramon Durazo-Arvizu
Scott J Cotler
Holly Kramer

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is common in advanced liver disease but its clinical significance remains controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation of 25-hydryoxyvitamin D levels with liver disease severity and calcium levels in adults with cirrhosis. This cross-sectional study included 180 adults with cirrhosis enrolled in a clinical cohort study at a single university hospital. The mean age was 58.8 (±9.2) years, and cirrhosis was attributed to alcohol use in 27.2%, hepatitis C in 35.0%, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in 27.2%, and both alcohol and hepatitis C in 10.6%. The median model for end-stage liver disease-sodium (MELD-Na) score was 12.0 (interquartile range 9.0–16.0), and mean serum albumin levels were 3.4 (±0.7) gm/dl. Median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were 28.0 (interquartile range 20–38) ng/mL, with 16 patients (8.9%) having levels <12 ng/ml and 43 (23.9%) with 25(OH)D levels <20 ng/ml. No correlation was noted between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and albumin-corrected calcium in the total group and in groups stratified by vitamin D supplementation. In contrast, both serum albumin (r = 0.32; P < 0.001) and MELD-Na scores were significantly correlated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (r = –0.29; P < 0.001). Correlations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and serum albumin (r = −0.39; P < 0.001) and MELD-Na scores did not change substantially after excluding 67 patients receiving vitamin D supplementation (r = −0.33; P = 0.009). In conclusion, total 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels correlate inversely with liver disease severity in adults with cirrhosis.

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How to Cite
Rech, M., Von Roenn, N., Durazo-Arvizu, R., Cotler, S., & Kramer, H. (2017). Vitamin D Levels are Associated with Liver Disease Severity in Patients with Cirrhosis. Journal of Renal and Hepatic Disorders, 1(2), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.15586/jrenhep.2017.15
Section
Original Articles Hepatology
Author Biographies

Megan A. Rech, Department of Emergency Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA

Emergency Medicine Clinical Pharmacist

Natasha Von Roenn, Division of Hepatology, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Hepatology

Loyola University Medical Center

Ramon Durazo-Arvizu, Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA

Professor of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University Chicago

Scott J Cotler, Department of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA

Professor of Medicine, Chair, Division of Hepatology, Loyola University Medical Center

Holly Kramer, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA

Associate Professor of Medicine

Public Health Sciences and Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension